21st Century Transportation

Efficient public transportation systems like intercity rail and clean bus systems would make America’s transportation future better for everyone by reducing traffic congestion and pollution and increasing our options for getting around.

Public transit, biking and walking for the future

Changing Transportation: Ohio PIRG Education Fund's series of reports on the dramatic changes underway in how Americans travel.

The last decade has shown that America can shift from old patterns of wasteful and auto-centric transportation. After sixty years of almost unmitigated driving increases, the average number of miles Americans drove decreased nine years in a row after 2004. This change is led by the Millennial generation and aided by technologies that make it easier to travel without owning a personal automobile.

Our work has helped to educate the public about these powerful trends and the need for policy to respond to and encourage further transformation. Our nation’s highway-focused transportation system leaves too many communities isolated from opportunity, creates too much pollution, causes health problems, and does a poor job of getting Americans where they want to go.  While Americans increasingly want to live in communities with other ways to travel, our vision for a national transportation system is largely stuck in the 1950s. Instead of simply lurching from one funding crisis to the next, our nation needs policy reforms for the 21st century.

Through a series of well researched and eye opening reports, public outreach and work with local coalitions and public officials, we've pushed for forward-looking reforms. We’ve turned the tide against wasteful highway expansion boondoggles. We've encouraged Departments of Transportation to recognize and plan for a shift toward more balanced travel choices. We’ve demonstrated the enormous benefits that have been gained so far with reductions in the nation’s volume of driving. There’s much work ahead to promote new planning and policy approaches that accomplish these goals and Ohio PIRG Education Fund is hard at work already. 

Issue updates

News Release | U.S. PIRG Education Fund | Transportation

As electric cars revolutionize the vehicle market, new study helps cities address infrastructure and parking challenges

With electric vehicles (EVs) hitting U.S. streets in record numbers, a new study by U.S. PIRG Education Fund, PennEnvironment Research and Policy Center and Frontier Group highlights best practices to help local officials make their cities as EV-friendly as possible. The new report, “Plugging In: Readying America’s Cities for the Arrival of Electric Vehicles,” includes local and state data about the projected number of electric cars expected on the road in coming years, and how cities can accommodate these new EVs with enough places to park and recharge.

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Report | U.S. PIRG Education Fund | Transportation

Plugging In

The adoption of large numbers of electric vehicles (EVs) offers many benefits for cities, including cleaner air and the opportunity to reduce greenhouse gas emissions. Electric vehicles are far cleaner than gasoline-powered cars, with lower greenhouse gas emissions and lower emissions of the pollutants that contribute to smog and particulate matter.

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Blog Post | Transportation

Good Things Come to Those On Bikes | Sean Doyle

Pull the bike out of the closet, pump up those tires, and dust off the helmet because it's Bike to Work Week!

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Blog Post | Transportation

Don’t Believe the Hype – Millennials’ Transportation Habits Are Changing | Sean Doyle

Despite news stories claiming that Millennials are buying up cars at record rates, the reality is quite different. After adjusting previous studies to account for differences in the size of the generations measured, on a per-capita basis, Millennials are 29 percent less likely than members of Generation X to own a car.

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Blog Post | Transportation

All Americans Deserve Clean Air to Breathe, On Earth Day and Every Day | Sean Doyle

U.S. DOT asks if we should measure global warming pollution from transportation.

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News Release | Ohio PIRG Education Fund | Transportation

OHIOANS RELIEVED BY DECISION NOT TO PRIVATE TURNPIKE

 

COLUMBUS –With the recent decision by the Ohio Turnpike and Infrastructure Commission to support Governor Kasich’s plan for the Turnpike, consumer watchdog organization Ohio Public Interest Research Group (Ohio PIRG) joins others around the state in breathing a collective sigh of relief that privatization is officially off the table.

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News Release | Ohio PIRG Education Fund | Transportation

OHIO PIRG STATEMENT ON KASICH’S TURNPIKE DECISION

Ohio Turnpike is one of Ohio’s most valuable public assets, built by the people and for the people.  We are glad that Governor Kasich intends to retain public control and make use of the public's lower capital costs. This is a wiser, more sensible option than privatization.

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Media Hit | Transportation

Possible lease of Ohio Turnpike raises questions for taxpayers, consumer group says

COLUMBUS, Ohio -- A statewide consumer group questions whether a possible lease of the Ohio Turnpike is a good deal for taxpayers.

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Media Hit | Transportation

Advocacy Group Warns Against Turnpike Privatization

An Ohio advocacy group is asking whether privatization of the Ohio Turnpike is the best option for taxpayers, warning that it could end up costing travelers and the state too much money.

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Media Hit | Transportation

Future of Ohio Turnpike Troubles Consumer Group

A consumer-advocacy group concerned about the potential privatization of the Ohio Turnpike wants Gov. John Kasich’s administration to answer a series of questions before making such a decision.

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Report | Ohio PIRG Education Fund | Transportation

A New Way to Go

America is in the midst of a technological revolution … and a big shift in our transportation habits.

Over the last 15 years, the Internet and mobile communications technologies have transformed the way Americans live and work. During that same period, growth in vehicle travel slowed and then stopped, with Americans today driving about as much on average as we did in 1996.

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Report | Ohio PIRG Education Fund | Transportation

Moving Off the Road

After sixty years of almost constant increases in the annual number of miles Americans drive, since 2004 Americans have decreased their driving per-capita for eight years in a row. Driving miles per person are down especially sharply among Millennials, America’s largest generation that will increasingly dominate national transportation trends. But some skeptics have suggested that the apparent end of the Driving Boom might be just a temporary hiccup in the trend toward more driving for Americans.

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Report | Ohio PIRG Education Fund | Transportation

A New Direction

The Driving Boom – a six decade-long period of steady increases in per-capita driving in the United States – is over.

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Report | Ohio PIRG Education Fund | Transportation

Eight Questions about the Future of the Ohio Turnpike

The State of Ohio recently spent $2.85 million to commission KPMG to analyze different possibilities for borrowing against future toll revenue to the Ohio Turnpike, including privatization. Will the study fairly portray the state’s options with the downsides and upsides? Here the Ohio PIRG Education Fund presents the eight questions Ohioans most need to ask.

 

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Report | Ohio PIRG | Transportation

Do Roads Pay for Themselves?

Highway advocates often claim that roads “pay for themselves,” with gasoline taxes and other charges to motorists covering—or nearly covering—the full cost of highway construction and maintenance, but they are wrong. 

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News Release | U.S. PIRG Education Fund and Environment America Research & Policy Center

One-third of all Americans live in areas that suffered through at least 100 days of poor air quality due to air pollution in 2018, according to a new report by Environment America Research & Policy Center, Frontier Group and U.S. PIRG Education Fund.

Report | Ohio PIRG Education Fund and Environment Ohio Research & Policy Center

People across America regularly breathe polluted air that increases their risk of premature death, and can also trigger asthma attacks and other adverse health impacts. In 2018, 108 million Americans lived in areas that experienced more than 100 days of degraded air quality. That is equal to more than three months of the year in which ground-level ozone (the main ingredient in smog) and/or particulate pollution was above the level that the EPA has determined presents “little to no risk.” These Americans live in 89 large and small urban areas,* and in 12 rural counties. Millions more Americans are exposed to damaging levels of air pollution, but less frequently. Policymakers can protect public health by strengthening air quality protections, reducing reliance on fossil fuels that contribute to air pollution, and cutting global warming pollution that will exacerbate future air quality problems.

News Release | U.S. PIRG

Cities across the country making the switch to electric buses are reaping benefits on dual fronts -- reducing emissions as well as operating expenses. A new report from U.S. PIRG Education Fund, Environment America Research & Policy Center and Frontier Group highlights the experience of six early adopters, illuminating the successes, challenges and lessons learned

Report | U.S. PIRG Education Fund

New report profiles six case studies of early electric bus adopters across the nation. By understanding common pitfalls and best practices, cities, agencies and school districts can ensure a smoother roll-out of electric buses, helping reduce climate pollution and protect public health.

News Release | Ohio PIRG Education Fund

Highway projects are notorious for wasting taxpayer dollars. In the fifth edition of their Highway Boondoggles report, Ohio PIRG Education Fund and Frontier Group identify nine new wasteful highway expansion projects across the country, slated to cost at least $25 billion collectively. Over five editions of the report, the groups have profiled 50 boondoggles.

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